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The blogspam code is live.

Living dangerously I switched DNS to point to the new codebase on my lunch hour.

I found some problems immediately; but nothing terribly severe. Certainly nothing that didn't wait until I'd finished work to attend to.

I've spent an hour or so documenting the new API this evening, and now I'm just going to keep an eye on things over the next few days.

The code is faster, definitely. The load is significantly lower than it would have been under the old codebase - although it isn't a fair comparison:

  • I'm using redis to store IP-blacklists, which expire after 48 hours. Not the filesystem.
  • The plugins are nice and asynchronous now.
  • I've not yet coded a "bayasian filter", but looking at the user-supplied options that's the plugin that everybody seems to want to disable. So I'm in no rush.

The old XML-RPC API is still present, but now it just proxies to the JSON-version, which is a cute hack. How long it stays alive is an open question, but at least a year I guess.

God knows what my wordpress developer details are. I suspect its not worth my updating the wordpress plugin, since nobody ever seemed to love it.

These days the consumers of the API seem to be, in rough order of popularity:

  • Drupal.
  • ikiwiki.
  • Trac

There are few toy-users, like my own blog, and a few other similar small blogs. All told since lunchtime I've had hits from 189 distinct sources, the majority of which don't identify themselves. (Tempted to not process their requests in the future, but I don't think I can make such a change now without pissing off the world. Oops.)

PS. Those ~200 users? rejected 12,000 spam comments since this afternoon. That's cool, huh?

Comments On This Entry

  1. [gravitar] MJ Ray

    I use the WordPress plugin but there are other plugins filtering before it. Can you give me a pointer to its git tree, please? Also, your WordPress password has probably been reset automatically since you last used it, so you'll need to do the recovery waltz.

  2. [author] Steve Kemp

    The wordpress module I produced used the wordpress SVN repository - I never had my own git/hg tree locally.

    The version of the code that was published is here:

    I suspect that nobody else can commit to that, but it has been years since I touched wordpress.org. I suspect I need to reset myself, delete the plugin, and let somebody else write/maintain blogspam2 - but I'm open to other ideas.

    The old API and the new API are pretty similar, so I expect updating the plugin wouldn't be hard - providing wordpress itself hasn't changed too much.

  3. [author] Steve Kemp

    There is now a wordpress pugin, tested against 3.6.1: